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Tips, Techniques, and Questions -- Technical questions or tips

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  #1  
Old 2020-11-29, 3:12pm
lisvit lisvit is offline
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Default Making glasses out of wine bottles - melting the rims

Hello everybody!

I found this forum after long searching all around the world wide web. I realise that the main subject of expertise for you guys is not exactly sodium glass... Anyway there might be an off chance someone would be able to help me? I have read some threads but none of them seems to answer my questions unfortunately...

I am looking to start making glasses out of recycled glass bottles and I need to melt the rims. I cut the bottles with a wet saw, and then need to make the rims smooth so they are usable.


Ideally in a timely and efficient manner . Through trial and error I have come to conclusion that using a lampworking torch is my best bet.

My main issue is the setup. I tried asking around and got two opposing opinions:

1) That I'll be fine with using propane +compressed air as sodium glass melts in much lower temp. than borosilicate glass
2) That I should be using propane with oxygen as it is more efficient

Thing is I need to buy a torch and go for one of those setups. I don't want to buy oxygen tanks if it's not necessary, as it is costly. Compressed air seems much simpler but might take longer to melt the rims. Deciding factors are cost and time required to make one glass.

I have a hard time deciding which of those setups should I go for. I would greatly appreciate any help as I'm in the dark right now. Thanks in advance!
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  #2  
Old 2020-11-29, 5:01pm
ESC ESC is offline
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Hey! A propane torch with compressed or even room air is certainly doable, but it's going to take forever. Most bottle glass is lower COE than the typical 104 sodium glass used to make beads. Even with a propane/oxy torch, it's going to be slower going than making things out of 104. If time is not a factor, a Hot Head torch is your go-to for inexpensive and getting the job done. I think you can still get them for around $40 or so. It's going to burn quite a bit hotter than a regular plumber's torch.
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  #3  
Old 2020-11-29, 5:38pm
Alaska Alaska is offline
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One way to process fire polishing soda glass for a drinking glass.

Article
http://www.bernhardranner.com/blog/2...fire-polishing

Video
www.youtube.com/watch?v=mSIwjvtZ38w
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  #4  
Old 2020-11-29, 5:40pm
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The way I look at it heat control is going to be a very important issue with any torch work.

Glass doesn't like to have inconsistent temperature in things as thick as bottles nor as large as something that you would drink out of.

If you are already cutting the "tumbler" out of the bottom part of the bottle using a wet saw I suggest you just continue to use the abrasive cutting wheel as a wet sanding surface and soften the edges of it by tilting the piece to round over the edge.

Don't get me wrong, I know that it can be done a torch but I think the skill learning curve can use up a lot of bottles due to heat control problems as well as annealing the whole tumbler once you have the cut edge shaped.
And you will want a kiln for annealing. They are not outrageously expensive but they do run a sizable chunk of change.
That learning curve can use up a lot of patience as well not to mention that breakage will leave you with scalpel sharp pieces of unpredictable shapes.
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Old 2020-11-30, 2:37pm
lisvit lisvit is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ESC View Post
Hey! A propane torch with compressed or even room air is certainly doable, but it's going to take forever. Most bottle glass is lower COE than the typical 104 sodium glass used to make beads. Even with a propane/oxy torch, it's going to be slower going than making things out of 104. If time is not a factor, a Hot Head torch is your go-to for inexpensive and getting the job done. I think you can still get them for around $40 or so. It's going to burn quite a bit hotter than a regular plumber's torch.
Thanks for the input! I've got to go for oxygen/propane mix then. Time is an issue to me


Quote:
Originally Posted by Alaska View Post
One way to process fire polishing soda glass for a drinking glass
I've seen the video on Youtube before and I was wondering whether it is proper technique


Quote:
Originally Posted by Speedslug View Post
The way I look at it heat control is going to be a very important issue with any torch work.

Glass doesn't like to have inconsistent temperature in things as thick as bottles nor as large as something that you would drink out of.

If you are already cutting the "tumbler" out of the bottom part of the bottle using a wet saw I suggest you just continue to use the abrasive cutting wheel as a wet sanding surface and soften the edges of it by tilting the piece to round over the edge.

Don't get me wrong, I know that it can be done a torch but I think the skill learning curve can use up a lot of bottles due to heat control problems as well as annealing the whole tumbler once you have the cut edge shaped.
And you will want a kiln for annealing. They are not outrageously expensive but they do run a sizable chunk of change.
That learning curve can use up a lot of patience as well not to mention that breakage will leave you with scalpel sharp pieces of unpredictable shapes.
Point taken. I've had some glasses made withpolished rims, and no matter how finely you try to soften them they just don't have the right feel. The glass still feels kind of sharp in your mouth. I don't mind the learning curve, I've already learned a lot and consider it a next step. I'm after the best results. Good point on the kiln, but for now I'm planning to try renting somebody else's to avoid buying it.

Last edited by lisvit; 2020-11-30 at 2:38pm. Reason: editing
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  #6  
Old 2020-11-30, 4:37pm
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GabiLoraine GabiLoraine is offline
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Please post pictures if/when you're able to do this... I've always wanted to do this too.

��Hi Phill!
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Old 2020-11-30, 4:38pm
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Speedslug Speedslug is offline
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Hey Gabi !!!
How you doing Girl !!??
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