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Tips, Techniques, and Questions -- Technical questions or tips

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  #1  
Old 2021-05-27, 2:47am
asyno1981 asyno1981 is offline
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Default Minimum equipment to start playing with glass

Hello everyone, I come up with the first question...
I would like to know in your opinion what would be the minimum equipment to start experimenting with glass. I'm not a big fan of beads, but I would love to play with small objects. I live in an apartment, so I would use a hot head without oxygen. In terms of pliers and accessories, what could I really not do without?
thank to all in advance
Max
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  #2  
Old 2021-05-27, 5:30am
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Moira Moira is offline
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I'm afraid the hand tools come way down the list.

The first thing you need to work glass is good ventilation, even on a hot head. Then you need an outdoor space to store your propane cylinder, to avoid any leaks causing an explosion. (You might keep a small blowtorch type cylinder indoors, but this will only give you half an hour of working time).
Consider your household insurance.

Then there's the safety kit - protective safety glasses (different ones for soft glass and boro), etc, and I haven't started on annealing...

If you want to pursue glasswork, you'd be better finding a class with all the equipment. For an idea of what you'll be spending when you are hooked and rent a studio space away from your home, look at glass craft suppliers for wherever you live, most of them offer a 'starter kit'. In the UK that's Tuffnell Glass, there are several in the US and others dotted around the world.

It's sad but true - glass is the most awkward and expensive material to set up a workshop for. An apartment isn't really the right place for it. Sorry.
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  #3  
Old 2021-05-28, 12:44am
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Speedslug Speedslug is offline
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Didymium eye protection.
Ventilation.


You CAN use a one pound camping tank of propane inside (meaning it's legal to have one in a house or apartment, IF your land lord doesn't freak out about it) but it's annoying how quickly they get chilled and they are prone to running out when you are in the middle of something interesting.

And really, a fan in the window is a bad idea.
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  #4  
Old 2021-05-28, 11:21am
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vetropod vetropod is offline
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I recommend taking a class if you can find one in your area, much better way to have the whole setup provided and get a general understanding. And a lot of places rent time for very reasonable rate as compared to getting set up. Good luck and have fun!!!
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Old 2021-06-19, 9:57pm
rcktscientist rcktscientist is online now
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If you are safe and resourceful, you can do it. I have.

** I previously had a full lampworking studio so I had some experience before trying this,
I would not recommend this idea for a first-timer!!! Listen,...try a class first.
Also, no consideration to insurance issues. Assume your own risk! **

SAFETY FIRST, then creativity...
FIRE - Kitchen fire extinguisher
EYES - Didymium glasses. Don't skimp
LUNGS - Vent hood fan above stove on maximum speed and kitchen window cracked open (vent must exhaust externally and have decent CFM. If your vent can't easily exhaust the rising heat from 1 rear burner on full, you're asking for trouble with this approach)
TORCH - Hot head on 1lb bottle in temporary but sturdy steel mount attached to stove-top. This one takes some creativity.
KILN/Rod warmer - Devardi mini kiln on alum baking half-sheet that sits across the 2 rear stove-top burners. (Stored on top of cart when not in use)
WORK SURFACE - I bought a 3-tier wire kitchen cart on casters and 2 - 1' x 2' 16ga steel sheets. 1 sheet goes across the 2 front stove-top burners and the other goes on top of the cart that is parked just to my side so I can set warm glass and tools on it.
STORAGE - the middle and bottom shelves/basket of the cart.
TOOLS/SUPPLIES - some COE104 glass , paddle or marver, tweezers, a shaping tool, etc.

So, you need to invest a minimum of $500 assuming no changes are needed to the apartment. Your work flow is limited to 4-hour runs (1lb propane bottle lifetime) and you don't have the luxury of being messy with hot bits of glass or hot tools. SLOW, methodical, and VERY SAFE work flow is the key.

I would do 2 hour sessions. Roll the cart out, set-up in about 15min, then work. Pendants, beads, marbles, and small sculptures are all possible.
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  #6  
Old 2021-07-14, 3:40pm
alindquist alindquist is offline
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Ditto on the class recommendation - take a good intro class first.
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  #7  
Old 2021-08-17, 6:54am
simcha simcha is offline
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I third the class recommendation. Watching YouTube videos is great and all, but it is not a substitute for having someone standing by your side guiding you on the proper techniques and what you are doing right/wrong. The safety of your eyes, lungs, body, etc. are at risk when working with glass so please make sure you educate yourself.
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  #8  
Old 2021-08-23, 10:14am
rcktscientist rcktscientist is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by asyno1981 View Post
Hello everyone, I come up with the first question...
I would like to know in your opinion what would be the minimum equipment to start experimenting with glass. I'm not a big fan of beads, but I would love to play with small objects. I live in an apartment, so I would use a hot head without oxygen. In terms of pliers and accessories, what could I really not do without?
thank to all in advance
Max
Asy,
I'd be willing to do a zoom call or something to show you my current set-up. I moved my equipment off the cart to a small bench that I built (2' x 3.5'). We can cover the subjects discussed here and maybe develop a plan to get you melting. There may also be potential for some instruction too. Lmk
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