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Studio -- Show us your studio setup

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  #61  
Old 2015-03-18, 7:48pm
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Tillie Tillie is offline
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I also used downspouts cut to length for rod storage. The empty place up at the top? Filled up with more cubbies, which are filled. The entire top 2 rows is DH glass.. You can see how much Ivory, white, blacks, and greens/blues I have....and I want more....prrreecccccciiiiooooosssss!
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  #62  
Old 2015-03-19, 11:03am
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Aye, the basics of white, black and clear you can get in one pound increments without question.
But the whites, blacks and clears all come with some slightly different characteristics from different manufacturers too so do some sleuthing to find some of the threads about the various kinds as well.
There is some thing called anniece white (someone please help me with the spelling here) that I have yet to get but I have heard it is really good at helping you find out if your torch settings are balanced for a neutral flame because it will show the slightest traces of soot on the end of a rod. I keep meaning to get some just to use for that purpose alone.

The ivory comes in three flavors that I know of and you should pair those with some sliver leaf and silver foil. Mixing ivory and silver unlocks a whole universe of reactions that can keep you mesmerized for years.

Oh and heating the snot out of intense black over ivory is another reaction that you will fall in love with. The fine tracery is a wonderful effect.
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Last edited by Speedslug; 2015-03-19 at 11:06am.
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  #63  
Old 2015-03-19, 11:16am
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True Phil. No need to pay the premium for intense black if you're just making a base bead for example, I mostly only use intense black in thin stringers when I want webbing (although I do encase it with clear & pull stringer when I don't want webbing but want true deep black with thin stringer too). I buy Effetre 064 black for general use, and 204 white for same, and 006 clear for most things too, for example. What is the third ivory? (light, dark, and ??)
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  #64  
Old 2015-03-19, 12:08pm
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Not sure Eileen, but for a while there, there was an ivory that 'curdled' for lack of a better description.
And Phill, Anice white is the devil incarnate. Spits and sputters all over the place if you don't treat it nicely. Not sure about the sooty coating if the gas proportions aren't proper.
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  #65  
Old 2015-03-19, 12:19pm
LunadelaOssa LunadelaOssa is offline
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It looks like companies that sell the glass decided to use the Italian word, anice, rather than the English anise. When I first saw the word description (online) of this color, I thought it was a misspelling. We have anise (an' iss) growing here, it's extract is used to flavor licorice. Haven't seen the glass up close and personal, but I do believe I will avoid this devil child.
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  #66  
Old 2015-03-19, 12:23pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ESC View Post
Not sure Eileen, but for a while there, there was an ivory that 'curdled' for lack of a better description.
I find that all of the dark ivory curdles if you work it in the flame for a bit, cooling and shaping.
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  #67  
Old 2015-03-19, 12:37pm
LunadelaOssa LunadelaOssa is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Speedslug View Post
The ivory comes in three flavors that I know of and you should pair those with some sliver leaf and silver foil. Mixing ivory and silver unlocks a whole universe of reactions that can keep you mesmerized for years.

Oh and heating the snot out of intense black over ivory is another reaction that you will fall in love with. The fine tracery is a wonderful effect.
There is a picture in Corina's book of the dark ivory with some black stringer decoration, it is because of this effect that I find myself favoring the dark ivory.

Ooh, and the clear for the base. Eileen, I'd love to hear more about this. There will be times when a clear base would be the preference.

ETA: Hmm.....Miss Tillie, might that be a Gollum reference?

Last edited by LunadelaOssa; 2015-03-19 at 12:45pm.
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  #68  
Old 2015-03-19, 2:06pm
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Many times I cover the clear with color and you don't really see it, just to make the color go further, because I find it easier to stock a lot of clear & smaller amounts of color. But sometimes I make a clear base then decorate it for BOC because I read where a parent said the kids like beads they can see through (I also use light transparent colors for that though). Also if I have a deep transparent that I want to not have so dense, I put a single coat over a clear base to lighten it up.
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  #69  
Old 2015-03-19, 2:14pm
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Another trick is to use your very least expensive glass as the inner core for your very most expensive glass. No sense hiding the good stuff on the inside of an opaque bead.


I went hunting for intense black a year or two ago and they wanted some $35 a pound for the stuff but they had intense black frit for $17 a pound so I bought two pounds and spend my un inventive hours at the torch converting frit back in to stringer.

Did I mention I love playing with fire?
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  #70  
Old 2015-03-22, 9:12am
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We Boro peeps do that all the time. Boro clear is cheap, Boro color starts at $65/pound and goes up from there. (Not counting cheap Asian import boro.)
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